Travel Guide

Garibaldi Lake Hike close to Whistler, BC Canada

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The gorgeous Garibaldi Lake with turquoise glacial waters, sits at 1450m above sea-level surrounded by snow-capped mountains, alpine meadows, and volcanic buildings. Mountain climbing to this stunning lake in Garibaldi Park is a very talked-about day exercise from Vancouver. It’s not a straightforward stroll to the lake, it’s an 18 km out and again hike to the lake, uphill the entire means that take most individuals about 6 hours. The 9km path to the lake is extensive and well-maintained ascending by means of outdated progress forest, passing creeks in a collection of steep uphill switchbacks. Garibaldi Lake is a superb tenting spot, swimming within the lake and climbing some extra trails within the park.

Hike Garibaldi Lake Map
Map created with our Garmin Fenix 5 GPS Watch

Garibaldi Lake Hike Statistics

  • Issue: Reasonable
  • Distance: 
    • Complete Distance spherical journey 20 km
    • Distance Path head to Lake Garibaldi 9km
    • Stroll across the lake : 1.6 km
  • Max Elevation: Peak 1612 m
  • Complete Elevation Acquire: 900 m
  • Time: four hours 50 minutes
  • Common Mountain climbing Time: something from four to 7 hours
Amazing view of Garibaldi Lake.
Wonderful view of Garibaldi Lake.

Garibaldi Nationwide Park

Garibaldi Nationwide Park is a wilderness park situated on the coastal mainland between Whistler and Vancouver. It’s simple to achieve and do lengthy in the future hikes from Vancouver, being situated 70 kilometers, about 1.5 hours drive, north of the town. The park is called after the glacier-ringed Mount Garibaldi (2,678-meters) and is a hiker’s paradise providing over 90 km of properly marked trails together with a number of of the highest trails in Canada comparable to Garibaldi Lake, Black Tusk, Panorama Ridge and Elfin Lakes.

Transport from Vancouver to Garibaldi Nationwide Park

It’s simple to achieve the path head by automobile from both Vancouver (70 km away), Whistler (35 km) or Squamish (38 km). To get to Garibaldi Provincial Park from Vancouver, take Freeway 99 referred to as the Sea-to-Sky Freeway. For automobile rental choices I like to recommend utilizing Rentalcar to match and e book a automobile from all the primary respected automobile rental firms in an round Vancouver.

From Vancouver the paths in Garibaldi will be reached by public transport utilizing the Parkbus. The bus service is at present $53 for a return ticket to Rubble Creek parking space on the path head. The bus leaves early within the morning and offers you about 10 hours to hike earlier than the return bus picks you up, this needs to be sufficient time to do any of the paths.

The Rubble Creek path head is even simpler to achieve by public transport from Squamish with the Shred Shuttle for $CAD 22 return.

In case you are alone and don’t wish to hike alone you may at all times attempt to hook up with somebody on the bus since everyone seems to be on the identical itinerary, most individuals go to hike to Garibaldi lake.

Wide, clear, well maintained trail to Garibaldi Lake.
Huge, clear, properly maintained path to Garibaldi Lake.

Mountain climbing to Garibaldi Lake – The Route

The hike to Garibaldi Lake begins from the Rubble Creek car parking zone, situated between Squamish and Vancouver. The climbing distance to the lake is 9 km (18 km return). It’s a extensive properly maintained path that will be onerous to unfastened. The path is properly marked with kilometer markers on the best way. There’s one small creek the place you may refill your water bottle about 2 km into the path. The primary kilometers is the steepest a part of the path with a collection of switchbacks from kilometer three to five. The route winds by means of a forest of largely Western Purple Cedar and Douglas Fir timber.

Small creek on the way where you can refill your bottle
There is just one small creek on the best way the place you may refill your bottle

Across the 5 kilometer mark there’s a lookout level over The Barrier, a lava dam.

Shortly after the 6km mark, you attain the Taylor Meadows Junction, there’s a map of the encompassing space right here. The steepest climb is over at this stage and many individuals cease right here for a little bit of a break. Going proper on the junction is the direct path to Garibaldi Lake, going left takes you thru Taylor Meadows, a phenomenal space with colourful alpine flowers throughout the late summer time and early fall. You additionally stroll this option to head to the Black Tusk mountain.

You move two smaller lakes Barrier Lake and Lesser Garibaldi Lake over the last three km earlier than reaching Garibaldi Lake.

Excellent blue Garibaldi Lake.

The lake is huge, it’s 5 km lengthy and four km extensive. A few hundred meters stroll on the lakeshore there’s a wood doc, it is a good spot to swim from and to simply sit and benefit from the stunning lake. Sure, you may swim within the lake! the water is a bit chilly, however not freezing, positively swimable. The right turquoise coloration of the lake originates from glacial flour suspended within the meltwater from its two main inflows, the massive Sphinx Glacier and the Sentinel Glacier.  Alongside the lake there are cooking shelters, pit bogs and the campsite. There are some trout within the lake so fishing will be achieved right here. To get again to the path head simply comply with the identical means down.

The doc next to the lake is a great spot for lunch and to take a swim from!
The dock subsequent to the lake is a superb spot for lunch and to take a swim from!

Garibaldi Lake Tenting

The Garibaldi Lake campsite is a spectacular space to camp. For those who spend the evening within the campsite there are some extra implausible climbing choices. You possibly can climb up Panorama Ridge for superb views of the lake or do the hike to Black Tusk and return to the campsite earlier than sundown. The campsite could be very well-liked and fills up rapidly in summer time so make reservations properly upfront. Make reservations right here. The campsite can accommodate 50 individuals, an extra 40 individuals can keep on the Taylor Meadows campsite which should even be reserved. Each campsites have pit bogs, nevertheless there isn’t a working or drinkable water and all rubbish should be packed out with you. The campsite at Taylor Meadows has a hut the place you’re allowed to retailer meals, however sleeping within the hut is just not allowed. The gap from Taylor Meadows campsite is just like Garibaldi Lake campsite from the Rubble Creek path head, about 9 km. Additionally it is potential to hike into Taylor Meadows from the Cheakamus Lake car parking zone through Helm Creek. That is apparently a troublesome hike and is normally achieved as a multi day tenting hike.

The Black Tusk is a long hike in one day and is a very popular hike when camping at Garibaldi Lake.
The Black Tusk is an extended hike in in the future and is a very talked-about hike when tenting at Garibaldi Lake.

Necessary suggestions

  • Carry your individual clear water or plan to boil water for consuming as there isn’t a clear water in Garibaldi Provincial Park. Even water from the creek at Taylor Meadows is just not really helpful to drink with out therapy. I carried a Lifestraw filter bottle for treating water.
  • There’s very restricted cell service within the park
  • It’s a nationwide park, no canine allowed in Garibaldi Provincial Park.



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Hey! A bit about us - we’re John & Maria and we're a couple that loves to travel the world and document our adventures! We enjoy writing, blogging, exploring and sharing our adventures. We’re always embarking on new journeys and here you’ll find articles covering many travel destinations, and topics, such as culture, history, art and cuisine. Our goal and mission is to present compelling stories, photography and personal opinions, as well as serve as an online resource for anyone who wishes to plan their own trips and visit the destinations we've been to. We genuinely love meeting new people, mingling with locals, listening to their amazing stories and trying new travel experiences.

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